Cities Skylines: Addictive. Shades of SimCity 2013

At the moment, I still really like Skylines. I have to think… I really liked SimCity 2013 for the first week or so too, though. After that time, its flaws starting to get pretty glaring:

  • Very simple. Practically impossible to fail.
  • Traffic AI leads to huge jams where you wouldn’t expect it.

The traffic situation, in particular, was a real Achilles’ heel. The agent-based simulation required good road connections or the whole city ground to a halt – fire engines couldn’t get to fires, so buildings would burn down, and ambulances couldn’t get to houses so people would die… and eventually the traffic would clear up simply because workplaces would shut down from lack of workers.

Oh simcity -_-

Cities Skylines has these same problems.

This happened in Cities: Skylines. The joys of traffic management.

Although… SimCity did have several other fundamental problems that Skylines does NOT have:

  • Tiny maps sizes.
  • …that could have been offset by the commuting / multiplayer system, but design decisions there totally broke it too, so it never worked as it should have.
  • Limited road options.
  • Freight – Commerce – Shopping cycle completely disabled because they couldn’t get it to work.
  • Always online fiasco.
  • Multiplayer mechanics (15 minute “sync cycles.”)

You just cannot accuse Skylines of having small maps. A single Skylines map is easily 6+ SimCity maps. They’re more akin to 6 SimCity 4 regions… all on the same map. It’s damn magic.

Their freight system – somewhat different to SimCities, but nonetheless similar – is there in all its glory. You are even given several tips and tools to try and keep the industrial freight from clogging up your commuter traffic, and several options for importing and exporting freight that your industry creates and commerce craves.

Speaking of clogging up commuter traffic, you have many different types of roads to choose from: Dirt service roads, two-way roads, one-way roads, all from 2 to 6 lanes and then highways and ramps on top of that. So, even though the traffic can be screwy, at least you’re given a bunch of tools to deal with their quirks. It’s not really enough, of course… I still spend the vast majority of my time analyzing why a particular intersection is clogged up, but I find it enjoyable.

I always felt SimCity had real potential. If commuting between cities was fixed, the servers stabilized, traffic AI improved enough that freight could be turned back on (I realise a cut-back version of it was turned on at one point) then it would have been a fun little game. After all the problems, though, EA/Maxis abandoned it after 2 lack-luster patches.

I feel the same way about Cities Skylines. It has REAL potential right now, but there are problems that pull it up short of being a really engaging city builder. For instance … I’ve not touched the tax rates at all, and I’m just rolling in the cash. In fact, I haven’t looked at my cash reserves for probably the last 10 hours. It’s just not a feature. This then ties into city / suburb / district policies you can set: smoke alarms, big business breaks, small business breaks, high-rise limitations, etc. Basically none of which I’ve bothered to touch because… I just don’t need to. It’s like being a mayor is a license to print money.

A HUGE advantage Cities has over SimCity though: It’s published by Paradox. A publisher that is famous for releasing games that are in need of polishing, and polishing them well. All their Europa games, and Hearts of Iron games, and yes, Cities in Motion, got this treatment.

Secondly, Cities Skylines has full modding support that the community is making full use of. Already the Steam Workshop is getting flooded with mods (mostly artwork, but several gameplay changes, such as a traffic inspection tool and an auto-bulldozer) so with some luck we can have balance overhauls to really make this baby shine.

Even with it’s flaws, I’m still incredibly addicted to it. I just expect that to wear off within the week (I’ll need to give a second city a go to put my new traffic-management skills to the test from the ground up) but after that? I think I’ll need to wait for some mods to mature there.

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I always thought Train Simulators were pretty silly. I’ve never wanted to play one so bad. Is there nothing dubstep can’t fix?

Off Da Railz!

Why the Oculus Rift will succeed

The internet is all a-buzz, all a-tweeter even, over the Oculus Rift(OR) and for good reason, I think.

Look, there’s a lot of speculation about the OR, but there are very few nay-sayers. That’s rare for the internet. Everyone that tries it are quick converts

(and penny arcade)

other than a few niggles, such as low resolution, which the developers promise will be ironed out there’s not much to complain about.

Is the OR the future of gaming? Or even the future of virtual reality — I’m talking virtual offices now (a Google+ post)?

Allow me to speculate:

Virtual Offices

Firstly let’s shoot down the “definitely nots.” No virtual offices. It’s just too different from what we currently do, there’s not enough gains, it will pull people too far out of their comfort zones and it will initially carry a stigma of being “for gaming.” People will also rebel at having to wear the device. For a work day? Not going to happen. People will even rebel because of how they look. Something with augmented reality might catch on – like Google Glass – because glasses have been, can be, and are, fashionable. Google has a ways to go on that front, and the tech, while promising, still has a ways to go to be actually useful.

Will the OR usher in a new revolution in gaming?

Well, it depends on what you mean by revolution. The OR won’t be for all games, or all gamers. There’s just nothing to gain for RTSs, strategy games, MOBAs, or even traditional FPSs. In the case of an FPS, it’ll actually be a detriment. You may find that odd, since a FPS might initially seem like the logical place to use an OR (and indeed the first games to support it are FPSs) but FPSs, in their current state, are strictly designed with a keyboard, mouse, (with controller shoe-horned in) and a monitor in mind. There are many conventions in place to make up for the shortcomings of a monitor to the point where… a FPS is really a very terrible way of simulating anything. It’s just a trope that is popular nowadays, just as a RTS is a terrible way of simulating war strategy.

What will happen, though, is a new raft of VR games will be created. You will need the periphal to play, or the experience will be pretty sub-par without. Something akin to the early days of mouse-driven games. It’s always possible to play with the keyboard, but really it was designed with the mouse in mind. I expect in the early days many games will be converted current-gen games. Games like Skyrim, Mirrors Edge, and TF2 overhauled. There will also be a number of games that can really benefit from VR as-is and just need to be made compatible with the OR: DCS and related modules, Hawken, Star Citizen, Cliffs of Dover, MechWarrior Online, iRacing – basically anything where you sit in a cockpit and ride.

Off the basis of this initial success will be the VR games. Games strictly from the first person, and will run the gamut of RPG, shooter, stealth, and let’s say “other” to cover bases that I might not have foreseen.

One side-effect of these new VR games will be the desire for a new form of input. This could be solved in many ways, but the old WSAD mouse and keyboard (or controller if you’re that way inclined) just won’t cut it. Not only will it be disorienting, uncomfortable, and a little unintuitive, but it’ll also put you at a distinct disadvantage. Those players who forego VR in favour of a traditional set up will simply be out-gunned, unless you turn the OR into a simple wearable monitor… which means you’ll quickly revert to your monitor for convenience’s sake.

The point of a full VR environment will be to take advantage of what it provides, and that means an avatar whose arms, hands, and head (at a minimum) you can control. Already, there are several solutions

(and The Leap Motion)

(or hell, some related solution built into the OR. Imagine a Leap Motion, 1 more year down the track, strapped to an OR) and I don’t know which will ultimately catch on. If I had to guess, I’d guess a multiple-camera solution. Largely because I think some sort of Kinect-like set up will be quite common with the next-gen consoles, but also the solution is all-round more powerful. With it, you could put your real body in the world, or as a skeleton for a 3D avatar, and it is not limited to just speculation based on where your hands are but actually represents your full body. Also, multiple-camera setups with the sorts of algorithms this guy is playing with (and I saw some early prototypes of it about 6-12 months ago) could have many other applications:

(e.g. 1998’s Enemy of the State’s near-future technology.)

Why so sure?

VR has been tried before. It was “just around the corner” from the mid-80s through to the mid-90s, but it just never quite got there. Those headsets were essentially two tiny little displays, strapped to your head. To be fair, the OR is basically the same idea, but it’s amazing what 20 years can do. The prototype screens are 1280×800, and the consumer version is supposed to be full 1080p (≥1920×1080.) Basically, compare your modern smart-phone screen – flat, thin, extremely high fidelity – to the “portable TVs” of the 90s

By cannibalising mobile phone / tablet components the OR is able to solve a myriad of other problems of prior VR attempts – latency, field of view, etc. This is why anyone that has tried it are converts.

But I have to tell you the smartest thing they have done. That’s raise the money with kickstarter – but for the development kit. This is essentially a prototype so devs can see how it works, pull it apart, and build things for it. It doesn’t really matter that the resolution is only 2/3rds the eventual consumer version, or that it only tracks rotation rather than lateral movement. You can make allowances for that when building your game. It means that when the OR officially drops, there’ll be a ton of good content out of the gate. And I know that devs will jump into this feet first, because of the hype.

It doesn’t take much Googling to see that the hype is there. That means we can guarantee that the first few hundred-thousand units will fly off the shelves, but what could really kill the OR from that point, is if it’s a gimmick without much to do. To be honest I think the Leap Motion could suffer from this, and Google Glass almost certainly will. The OR, however, I think will have real content – AAA in the form of Hawken, Star Citizen, and TF2 – and indie (and who knows what form that will take) that will keep users begging for more. With the successful launch, you better believe more content will come. And fast. With more content will come more devices and with more devices will come competition, innovation, and hopefully standardisation. I’m sure many games will shoe-horn the OR in when it’s not really needed… but I fully expect some very exciting, immersive, and quality content as well.

One I can think of is a first-person, VR, co-op Splinter Cell; silently signalling my allies with hand-signals, as we use our silenced pistols to clear rooms. Actually, I am also thinking of a lightsaber dueling game. Oh, and VR co-op zombie survival… how about a new X-Wing vs TIE fighter…