Massive Chalice – I featured!

So I backed Massive Chalice at the level that allowed me to add my own house to the game.

Double Fine do a live stream each week showing off the game. I decided to check out live stream 24 … and my house appeared in game! Check it out: my house Arnold-Amon (it makes an appearance a few seconds in)

Then at 7:50 my battlecry gets quoted!

At 22:00 my descendant is married and given a keep: Huntsville! (named after my cat :))

Holy Crapola! Wild West XCOM? That’s a Backin’

Check out this Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1752350052/hard-west

How damn cool does that look? XCOM wildwest, with HOMM overland map? Oh god yes. Just check out that gunfight!

And the mechanics they’re espousing:

The combat is fast. The whole combat encounter takes no more than 5-10 minutes. It’s short, bloody, and decisive. All it takes is one well laid shot. It’s just not that easy to put yourself in the proper position.

No peeling off HPs. HPs represent the ability to withstand a shot or two, alternatively to sustain a powerful blow.

There’s little randomization: you either make good predictions and good decisions to land a kill, or you die. There’s no victory without risk, but it’s a well calculated risk.

BANGBANGBANG! Look at ’em go! I’m a backer. Maybe you should be too?

Massive Chalice. A Kickstarter Game I Need to Back

Crowd-sourced funding for old-school genres is all the rage lately, and I love it! Tim Shafer and Double-fine started it all with Broken Age. Now, I love the idea of crowd-sourced games, but that doesn’t mean I fund every one that I see. In fact, I didn’t even back “double-fine adventure” because although I might play it if it is good, I’m not so enamored with the genre that I want to be an early adopter.

Massive Chalice, on the other hand, I will definitely be backing. It sounds just awesome! I loved the kickstarter video – it would not be nearly as good without the stilted acting – but if you want to just get down to the ideas skip to 3:50. I can’t explain it any better than Brad Muir does on the page itself. My favourite bit is the artifacts that heroes leave behind when they die, that their ancestors can then weld! Check it out! Back it if you dare!

Spider-man 2 was always the best Spider-man

It’s a travesty that each subsequent Spider-man game undid the great work of the web-slinging from Spider-man 2. It’s even more amazing to me that reviewers were generally positive of subsequent Spider-man games too. They should have been TORN to shreds for abandoning that idea. Spider-man 2 was easily the best superhero game made until Batman Arkham Asylum came along – entirely because of the web-slinging mechanic (the combat was pretty shitty, to be honest.)

Now the guy responsible for that mechanic is back – WITH that mechanic! I will support him, oh yes – although I am a little bummed it’s not attached to the classic arachnid’s IP. Still, it looks like it will be lots of fun regardless.

http://kck.st/131RUFr

Why the Oculus Rift will succeed

The internet is all a-buzz, all a-tweeter even, over the Oculus Rift(OR) and for good reason, I think.

Look, there’s a lot of speculation about the OR, but there are very few nay-sayers. That’s rare for the internet. Everyone that tries it are quick converts

(and penny arcade)

other than a few niggles, such as low resolution, which the developers promise will be ironed out there’s not much to complain about.

Is the OR the future of gaming? Or even the future of virtual reality — I’m talking virtual offices now (a Google+ post)?

Allow me to speculate:

Virtual Offices

Firstly let’s shoot down the “definitely nots.” No virtual offices. It’s just too different from what we currently do, there’s not enough gains, it will pull people too far out of their comfort zones and it will initially carry a stigma of being “for gaming.” People will also rebel at having to wear the device. For a work day? Not going to happen. People will even rebel because of how they look. Something with augmented reality might catch on – like Google Glass – because glasses have been, can be, and are, fashionable. Google has a ways to go on that front, and the tech, while promising, still has a ways to go to be actually useful.

Will the OR usher in a new revolution in gaming?

Well, it depends on what you mean by revolution. The OR won’t be for all games, or all gamers. There’s just nothing to gain for RTSs, strategy games, MOBAs, or even traditional FPSs. In the case of an FPS, it’ll actually be a detriment. You may find that odd, since a FPS might initially seem like the logical place to use an OR (and indeed the first games to support it are FPSs) but FPSs, in their current state, are strictly designed with a keyboard, mouse, (with controller shoe-horned in) and a monitor in mind. There are many conventions in place to make up for the shortcomings of a monitor to the point where… a FPS is really a very terrible way of simulating anything. It’s just a trope that is popular nowadays, just as a RTS is a terrible way of simulating war strategy.

What will happen, though, is a new raft of VR games will be created. You will need the periphal to play, or the experience will be pretty sub-par without. Something akin to the early days of mouse-driven games. It’s always possible to play with the keyboard, but really it was designed with the mouse in mind. I expect in the early days many games will be converted current-gen games. Games like Skyrim, Mirrors Edge, and TF2 overhauled. There will also be a number of games that can really benefit from VR as-is and just need to be made compatible with the OR: DCS and related modules, Hawken, Star Citizen, Cliffs of Dover, MechWarrior Online, iRacing – basically anything where you sit in a cockpit and ride.

Off the basis of this initial success will be the VR games. Games strictly from the first person, and will run the gamut of RPG, shooter, stealth, and let’s say “other” to cover bases that I might not have foreseen.

One side-effect of these new VR games will be the desire for a new form of input. This could be solved in many ways, but the old WSAD mouse and keyboard (or controller if you’re that way inclined) just won’t cut it. Not only will it be disorienting, uncomfortable, and a little unintuitive, but it’ll also put you at a distinct disadvantage. Those players who forego VR in favour of a traditional set up will simply be out-gunned, unless you turn the OR into a simple wearable monitor… which means you’ll quickly revert to your monitor for convenience’s sake.

The point of a full VR environment will be to take advantage of what it provides, and that means an avatar whose arms, hands, and head (at a minimum) you can control. Already, there are several solutions

(and The Leap Motion)

(or hell, some related solution built into the OR. Imagine a Leap Motion, 1 more year down the track, strapped to an OR) and I don’t know which will ultimately catch on. If I had to guess, I’d guess a multiple-camera solution. Largely because I think some sort of Kinect-like set up will be quite common with the next-gen consoles, but also the solution is all-round more powerful. With it, you could put your real body in the world, or as a skeleton for a 3D avatar, and it is not limited to just speculation based on where your hands are but actually represents your full body. Also, multiple-camera setups with the sorts of algorithms this guy is playing with (and I saw some early prototypes of it about 6-12 months ago) could have many other applications:

(e.g. 1998’s Enemy of the State’s near-future technology.)

Why so sure?

VR has been tried before. It was “just around the corner” from the mid-80s through to the mid-90s, but it just never quite got there. Those headsets were essentially two tiny little displays, strapped to your head. To be fair, the OR is basically the same idea, but it’s amazing what 20 years can do. The prototype screens are 1280×800, and the consumer version is supposed to be full 1080p (≥1920×1080.) Basically, compare your modern smart-phone screen – flat, thin, extremely high fidelity – to the “portable TVs” of the 90s

By cannibalising mobile phone / tablet components the OR is able to solve a myriad of other problems of prior VR attempts – latency, field of view, etc. This is why anyone that has tried it are converts.

But I have to tell you the smartest thing they have done. That’s raise the money with kickstarter – but for the development kit. This is essentially a prototype so devs can see how it works, pull it apart, and build things for it. It doesn’t really matter that the resolution is only 2/3rds the eventual consumer version, or that it only tracks rotation rather than lateral movement. You can make allowances for that when building your game. It means that when the OR officially drops, there’ll be a ton of good content out of the gate. And I know that devs will jump into this feet first, because of the hype.

It doesn’t take much Googling to see that the hype is there. That means we can guarantee that the first few hundred-thousand units will fly off the shelves, but what could really kill the OR from that point, is if it’s a gimmick without much to do. To be honest I think the Leap Motion could suffer from this, and Google Glass almost certainly will. The OR, however, I think will have real content – AAA in the form of Hawken, Star Citizen, and TF2 – and indie (and who knows what form that will take) that will keep users begging for more. With the successful launch, you better believe more content will come. And fast. With more content will come more devices and with more devices will come competition, innovation, and hopefully standardisation. I’m sure many games will shoe-horn the OR in when it’s not really needed… but I fully expect some very exciting, immersive, and quality content as well.

One I can think of is a first-person, VR, co-op Splinter Cell; silently signalling my allies with hand-signals, as we use our silenced pistols to clear rooms. Actually, I am also thinking of a lightsaber dueling game. Oh, and VR co-op zombie survival… how about a new X-Wing vs TIE fighter…